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The 1st century AD was the century that lasted from AD 1 to AD 100.

Events of the 1st century[]

  • ‘Incarnation’ of Jesus Christ, c. 4 BC - c. 33 AD
  • Ministry of John the Baptist. Start of ministry sometime between September 18, 28 and September 17, 29 AD
  • Mark establishes Coptic Christianity, c. 42 AD (according to tradition).
  • Saul of Tarsus, Conversion in 35. Ministry of Paul, 35 - c. 67 AD. Died in Rome, beheaded by Nero, according to tradition.
  • Emperor Nero begins persecution of Christians, c. 65 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt, 66 - 73 AD
  • Ignatius of Antioch succeeds Euodius, becomes third Bishop of Antioch, 68 AD
  • Destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, c. 70 AD
  • New Testament written.
  • Latest date of composition for the Dead Sea Scrolls.
  • Herod Archelaus, ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, is deposed and banished to vienne in Gaul. His ethnarchy comes under direct Roman rule as the Iudaea Province, 6 AD
  • Coponius becomes the first procurator of Iudaea Province, 6 AD
  • Quinerius, legate of Syria, orders a census of the new province. Judas of Galilee leads a failed revolt against the census, but his followers become the Zealots. Acts 5:37 lists him as a false messiah, 6 AD
  • Finding in the Temple (early date), 6 AD
  • Roman legate Quirinius appoints Annas, son of Seth, appointed High Priest of Israel, 8 AD
  • Marcus Ambivulus becomes procurator of Iudaea Province, 9 AD
  • Annius Rufus is appointed Prefect of Judea, 12 AD
  • Quirnius returns from Judea to become counsellor to Tiberius, 12 AD
  • The Roman Senate confirms Tiberius position as Princeps. (Roman Emperor), September 18, 14 AD
  • Valerius Gratus becomes prefect of Iudaea Province, 15 AD
  • Valerius Gratus deposes Annas, son of Seth, as high priest, and appoints Ishmael, son of Fabi, 15 AD
  • Valerius Gratus, prefect of Iudaea Province, deposes Ishmael, son of Fabi, as high priest and appoints Eleazar, son of Arianus, 16 AD
  • Valerius Gratus, prefect of Iudaea Province, deposes Eleazar, son of Arianus, as high priest and appoints Simon, son of Carnith, 17 AD
  • Valerius Gratus, prefect of Iudaea Province, deposes Simon, son of Carnith, as high priest and appoints Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of Annas, 18 AD
  • The House of Shammai, a conservative faction among the Pharisees, begin their domination of the Sanhedrin. These are most likely the faction of Pharisees that opposed Jesus, 20 AD
  • Philo of Alexandria, a Hellenized Jewish philosopher who combined Greek Stoic philosophy with Judaism, declares that the Old Testament is the eternal law of God, 24 AD
  • Pontius Pilate appointed prefect of Iudaea Province, 26 AD
  • Jesus begins his public ministry, 30 AD
  • Baptism of Jesus, 30 AD
  • Imprisonment of John the Baptist, 30 AD
  • Sermon on the Mount, 30 AD
  • Symbolic interpretation of the Old Testament by Philo of Alexandria (Allegory). Philo was a Hellenized Jew who applied Greek philosophy (especially Stoicism) to the Jewish scriptures, 32 AD

The following chronology uses traditional dates; 30 and 28 are also suggested as a date for these events, and are currently considered the likely dates.

  • Pontius Pilate is recalled to Rome after putting down a Samaritan uprising, 36 AD
  • Herod Antipas is remarried. This angers his first father-in-law, Aretas de Nabatene, who demolishes Herod militarily. Antipas calls for help from Tiberius. However, Tiberius ignores the request, as his governor of Syria, Vitellius, is reticent to support Herod. According to Josephus, Herod's defeat was popularly believed to be divine punishment for his execution of John the Baptist, 36 AD
  • Marcellus is put in charge of affairs in Iudaea Province. It is unclear whether or not he was ever officially a prefect or procurator. Herod Agrippa also had an ambition to rule Iudaea, although the Romans didn't officially recognize this until 41 AD. 36 AD
  • The Roman Senate annuls Tiberius' will and proclaims Caligula Roman Emperor, March 18, 37 AD
  • Saint Peter founds the Syrian Orthodox Church. (traditional date), 37 AD
  • Probable year of the conversion of the Pharisee Saul of Tarsus to Christianity after a vision. After 39 AD he is recognized as Saint Paul, 37 AD
  • Apion heads a deputation to Roman Emperor Caligula to complain about the Jews in Alexandria, 38 AD
  • Anti-Jewish riot breaks out in Alexandria during a visit by Herod Agrippa I: the mob wants to place statues of Caligula in every synagogue. The Jews consider this to be a form of idolatry, 38 AD
  • Stachys the Apostle (one of the 70) becomes the second patriarch of Constantinople, following the apostle Andrew (one of the 12), 38 AD
  • King Agrippa I of Iudaea, is recalled to Rome, 39 AD
  • Philo of Alexandria, a Hellenized Jewish philosopher who interpreted Jewish Scriptures through the lens of Stoic philosophy, leads a Jewish delegation to Rome to protest the anti-Jewish conditions in Alexandria, 39 AD
  • Roman emperor Caligula orders that a statue of himself be placed in the temple in Jerusalem. A similar order in Alexandria the previous year had led to riots. The governor of Syria, Publius Petronius, who is responsible for erecting the statue, faces mass demonstrations by Jews of the region and manages to delay construction of the statue until the death of Caligula on January 24, 41, 39 AD
The Roman Emperors were considered to be gods, and thus their statues served as idols. This, of course, was considered blasphemous to Judaism and Christianity alike. Emperors Augustus and his successor Tiberius tolerated Judaism and other ancient religions in the Eastern empire; however, Caligula was less respectful.
  • The Sanhedrin ceases to function in its full mode, 40 AD
  • Possible date for the writing of 3 Maccabees, 40 AD
  • Peter's vision of the sheet ("What God has cleansed, you must not call unclean.") prompts him to accept Cornelius the centurion as the first Gentile convert to Christianity. (Acts 10), 40 AD
  • Roman Emperor Caligula is assassinated by his disgruntled Praetorian Guards. Caligula is succeeded by his uncle Claudius, January 24, 41 AD
  • Roman Empire Claudius restores religious freedom to Jews throughout the empire, but prohibits Jews in Rome from proselytizing, 41 AD
  • Claudius appoints Herod Agrippa as King of Judea, 41 AD
  • The disciples of Jesus form communities after the Jewish Diaspora, especially in Damascus and Antioch. For the first time they are called Christians. (Acts 11:26), 41 AD
  • A group of Christian prophets head from Jerusalem to Antioch. One of them, Agabus, predicts a severe famine, which comes to pass four years later (Acts 11:27-30), 41 AD
  • Mark becomes the first bishop of Alexandria, 42 AD
  • During Passover, Herod Agrippa beheads James the son of Zebedee, and imprisons the apostle Peter (Acts 12) God sends an angel to release Peter from prison, 44 AD
  • Herod Agrippa heads to Caesarea to sue for peace among the inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon, who depended on Judea for food. The people proclaimed Agrippa to be a god, but the true God struck Agrippa down, 44 AD
  • Iudaea Province returns to direct Roman rule. Cuspius Fadus appointed procurator, 44 AD
  • Rebellion of the false messiah Theudas, according to Josephus. Gamaliel also mentions Theudas in Acts 5:36, although he dates Thedudas to before Judas of Galilee (ie, previous to 6 AD). It is possible that Gamaliel was referring to a different Theudas, 45 AD
  • Roman Emperor Claudius expels the Jews from Rome, 45 AD
  • Severe famine, as predicted by the Christian prophet Agabus in 41. Forewarned, the disciples in Antioch send relief to their brothers in Judea, by way of Paul and Barnabas (Acts 11:28-30), 45 AD
  • Paul begins his missionary travels, according to one traditional dating scheme, 45 AD
  • Tiberius Julius Alexander becomes Roman procurator of Iudaea Province, 46 AD
  • Ananias, son of Son of Nedebaios, becomes high priest in Judea, 47 AD
  • Marcus Julius Agrippa, son of Herod Agrippa, becomes King of the Jews. Judea is returned piecemeal to him between 48 and 54 AD.
  • Publius Ventidius Cumanus becomes Roman procurator of Iudaea Province, 48 AD
  • Epistle of James written, 49 AD
  • The Council of Jerusalem. Paul, Barnabas and Titus travel to Jerusalem to meet with the leaders of the Jerusalem Church and debate whether or not Gentile converts to Christianity need to be circumcised. James the Just rules that they do not. (Acts 15:1-29; Galatians 2), 49 AD
  • Paul, Barnabas, Judas Barsabbas and Silas travel to Antioch with news of the Council's decision. Judas and Silas return to Jerusalem, while Paul and Barnabas remain to preach in Antioch. (Acts 15:30-35), 49 AD
  • Paul and Barnabas part company after a dispute over John Mark. Paul travels with Silas and begins his second missionary journey, starting from Antioch, while Barnabas travels with John Mark. (Acts 15:36-41), 50 AD
  • Paul and Silas travel to Derbe and Lystra, and meet Timothy in Lystra. Timothy's mother was a Jew, while his father was a Gentile; Paul circumcised Timothy. (Acts 16:1-5), 50 AD
  • Paul, Silas and Timothy travel through Phrygia and Galatia. The Holy Spirit forbids them to travel to Asia or Bithynia. Instead, a vision inspires them to travel to Macedonia.(Acts 16:6-12), 50 AD
  • Paul and Silas imprisoned: While in Macedonia, Paul's entourage spend some days in Phillipi. Upon leaving the city, they stayed with Lydia of Thyatira. Paul casts a demon out of a young female fortune teller. Her masters, having lost their source of income, drag Paul and Silas before the city magistrates, who strip Paul in Silas, beat them with rods, and have them imprisoned.. At midnight, an earthquake loosens the prisoner's bonds and opens all the doors. The jailer, fearing that the prisoners had escaped, was about to commit suicide when Paul informed him, "Don't harm yourself, for we are all here!" The jailer came to believe in God and was baptized. The next day, the city magistrates order Paul and Silas to be freed. Paul points out that he is a roman citizen, and thus the magistrates and their sergeants have violated Roman jurisprudence. Paul and Silas agree to depart the city. (Acts 16:13-40), 50 AD
  • Paul writes The First Epistle to the Thessalonians and his Epistle to the Galatians, 51 AD
  • Paul and Silas travel through Amphipolis and Apollonia, and preach in Thessalonica for three weeks, staying with Jason. Some of the Jews are converted to Christianity, but unconverted Jews accuse Paul and Silas of sedition: "These all act contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, Jesus!" Paul and Silas then travel to Beroea. However, the Jews of Thessalonica follow them to Beroa with the same accusations (Acts 17:1-15), 51 AD
  • Paul and Silas leave Beroa for Athens. Paul notices an idol dedicated "to the unknown god," which he identifies with the true God: "What therefore you worship in ignorance, this I announce to you." In the Areopagus (the Hill of Ares), Paul debates with Epicurean and Stoic philosophers concerning the nature of God and salvation. (Acts 17:16-34), 51 AD
  • Thomas establishes a Church in India (according to the Acts of Thomas), 69 AD
  • Paul leaves Athens for Corinth and stays with Jews named Aquila and Priscilla. He spends eighteen months there, joined by Silas and Timothy, who head down from Macedonia. Paul preaches to the Jews of Athens, who oppose him. Paul speaks out, "Your blood be on your own heads! I am clean. From now on, I will go to the Gentiles!" Paul stays with Justus, a God-fearing Gentile, and establishes the church in Corinth. (Acts 18:1-11), 52 AD
  • While in Corinth, Paul appears before Gallio, proconsul of Achaea Province (southern Greece. A group of Jews accuse Paul: "This man persuades men to worship God contrary to the law." Gallio dismisses the charges, stating "For I don't want to be a judge of these matters." (Acts 18:12-16), 52 AD
  • Marcus Antonius Felix becomes procurator of Iudaea Province, 52 AD
  • High Priest Ananias is sent to Rome after Quadratus, governor of Syria, accuses him of violence. Ananias was acquitted by the Roman Emperor Claudius, 52 AD
  • Euodius succeeds Saint Peter as Patriarch of Antioch; Peter heads for Corinth, 53 AD
  • Paul of Tarsus begins a three-year stay in Ephesus Acts 19), 53 AD
  • Paul writes his First Epistle to the Corinthians, 53 AD
  • Roman emperor Claudius dies, possibly after being poisoned by Agrippina, his wife and niece, and is succeeded by Nero, October 13, 54 AD
  • Onesimus succeeds Stachys the Apostle as Bishop of Byzantium (the title was later known as the Patriarch of Constantinople), 54 AD
  • Paul of Tarsus begins his third mission, 54 AD
  • Apollos, a later assistant of Paul, is converted to Christianity in Ephesus, 54 AD
  • Violence erupts in Caesarea regarding the a local ordinance restricting the civil rights of Jews, creating clashes between Jews and pagans. The Roman garrison, made up of Syrians, takes the side of the pagans. The Jews, armed with clubs and swords, meet in the marketplace. The Governor of Judaea, Antonius Felix orders his troops to charge. The violence continues and Felix asks Nero to arbitrate. Nero, sides with the pagans and relegates the Jews to second-class citizens. This decision does nothing but increase the Jews' anger, 54 AD
  • Judea is returned piecemeal to Herod Agrippa's son Marcus Julius Agrippa between 48 and 54 AD
  • The apostle Paul writes his First Epistle to the Corinthians, 55 AD
  • According to the Liber Pontificalis and the Liberian Catalogue, Linus becomes Bishop of Rome, although not yet pope. Peter may have been in Corinth at the time (cf 1 Corinthians 1:12), 55 AD
  • Paul of Tarsus writes his Second Epistle to the Corinthians (probable date), 57 AD
  • The apostle Paul is arrested in Jerusalem, and is imprisoned in Caesarea, under the rule of Roman Procurator Marcus Antonius Felix. Paul is imprisoned for two years. (Acts 24), 58 AD
  • Paul remains in chains in a Jerusalem prison, while procurator Marcus Antonius Felix procrastinates about deciding his fate Acts 24, 59 AD
  • Porcius Festus is appointed Procurator of Iudaea Province. King Herod Agrippa II rules the northeast of Judea, 60 AD
  • Festus holds a hearing to determine the fate of Paul, who has been in prison in Ceasarea for two years.. Paul invokes his Roman citizenship, and Festus sends Paul to Rome to be judged. (Acts 25-26), 60 AD
  • Paul writes his Epistle to the Romans, 60 AD
  • Paul of Tarsus journeys to Rome, but is shipwrecked at Malta. He stays on Malta for three months and converts the Roman governor Publius, 60 AD
  • The First Epistle of Peter, if by Saint Peter, is probably written between this year (60 AD) and c. 64 AD.
  • Luke writes his gospel, 60 AD
  • Paul's Journey to Rome, 61 AD
  • Lucceius Albinus is appointed Procurator of Iudaea Province, 62 AD
  • Paul of Tarsus is imprisoned in Rome (approximate date). While in prison, Paul writes the epistles to the Epistle to the Colossians, Philemon, Ephesians, Philippians, 62 AD
  • Paul's first Roman imprisonment is the last episode written in the Acts of the Apostles. Thus, this is the earliest possible date Acts may have been written, 62 AD
  • Simeon of Jerusalem succeeds James the Just as Bishop of Jerusalem. Simeon is either the apostle Simon the Zealot, or Simon, brother of Jesus the brother (or cousin) of the Lord mentioned in Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3), 62 AD
  • According to legend, Joseph of Arimathea goes to Glastonbury on the first Christian mission to Britain, 63 AD
  • The Great fire of Rome: A fire began to burn in the merchant area of Rome and soon burned completely out of control while Emperor Nero allegedly played his lyre and sang while watching the blaze from a safe distance, although there is no hard evidence to support this claim, and it is worth pointing out that fires were very common in Rome at the time. The fire destroyed close to one-half of the city and it was officially blamed on the Christians; a small but growing religious movement. Nero was accused of being the arsonist by popular rumour, July 18, 64 AD
  • In Rome, persecution of early Christians begins under Roman Emperor Nero, 64 or 65 AD
  • First Epistle of Peter is written, 64 AD
  • Gessius Florus appointed Roman Procurator of Iudaea Province, 64 AD
  • Marcus Antonius Julianus becomes Roman Procurator of Iudaea Province, 66 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73). The Zealots take Jerusalem and the Sicarii capture the fortress of Masada. Cestius Gallus, legate of Syria, enters Judea in an attempt to put down the rebellion, 66 AD
  • Paul writes The First Epistle to Timothy (approximate date), 66 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73): Cestus Gallus, legate of Syria, conquers Beit Shearim, seat of the Great Sanhedrin, but is unable to capture Jerusalem. While withdrawing from the Jerusalem battle, he is defeated at Beth-horon by forces led by the Zealot Eleazar ben Simon, 67 AD
  • According to the church historian Eusebius, the Christian community leaves Jerusalem, forewarned by a prophecy of Jesus recorded in Luke 21:20-24, 67 AD
  • Roman Emperor Nero appoints General Vespasian, the future Roman emperor (69 - 79), to command the forces formerly led Cestus Gallus, 67 AD
  • The historian Josephus, leader of the rebels in Galilee, is captured by the Romans led by Vespasian, 67 AD
  • Pope Linus succeeds Simon Peter, 67 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73) continues. Zealots control Jerusalem, the sicari control Masada, and Vespasian controls the Roman troops, 68 AD
  • Galba succeeds Nero as Roman Emperor, June 8, 68 AD
  • Ignatius of Antioch succeeds Euodius, becomes third Bishop of Antioch, 68 AD
  • Anianus of Alexandria succeeds Mark the Evangelist as Bishop of Alexandria, 68 AD
  • Book of Revelation written (according to Preterist view; traditional view is 95.), 68 AD
  • The Gospel of Mark is written (probable date), 68 AD
  • The Essenes place the Dead Sea Scrolls in the caves at Qumran, 68 AD
  • Year of the Four Emperors: Galba, Otho, Vitellius, and Vespasian, 69 AD
  • Roman Emperor Otho succeeds Galba - January 15
  • Roman Emperor Vitellius succeeds Otho - April 17
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73) Vespasian lays siege to Jerusalem, controlled by the Zealots. After Vespasian leaves the battle to claim his title as Roman emperor, his son Titus Flavius Sabinus Vespasianus captures Jerusalem. Masada remains under control of the Sicarii, 69 AD
  • Roman Emperor Vespasian succeeds Vitellius - July 1, 69 AD
  • Polycapus succeeds Onesimus as Bishop of Byzantium (the title was later known as the Patriarch of Constantinople, 69 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73) Roman troops led by Titus Flavius Vespasianus breach the middle wall of Jerusalem, June 5, 70 AD
  • Fall of Jerusalem: Roman troops destroy the Jewish temple, leaving only the western wall (later known as the Wailing Wall) standing. The Romans abolish the Jewish high priesthood and the Sanhedrin. The Jewish religious leadership moves from Jerusalem to Jamnia. Jews to this day remember the destruction of the Temple during the fast of Tisha B'Av. These events fulfill the prophecies of Daniel (Daniel 9:26) and Jesus (Matthew 24:1-2, Mark 13:2, and Luke 21:20-24). According to the Christian historian Eusebius, Christians living in Jerusalem had left the city three years earlier, August 4, 70 AD
  • The sicarii remain in control of Masada, 70 AD
  • Neapolis (present day Nablus) is founded in Iudaea Province, 70 AD
  • Christianity is established in Gaul (later France); according to tradion, St. Rufus, the son of Simon of Cyrene and a disciple of the apostle Paul, became the first bishop of Avignon. Rufus is mentioned in Mark 15:21 and Romans 16:13, 70 AD
  • The Roman General Titus Flavius Vespasianus, leader of the Roman forces fighting the Great Jewish Rebellion (66 - 73), is made praetorian praefect and receives pro-consular command and also tribunician power. Titus was the son of Roman Emperor Vespasian, and succeeded his father in 79 AD, 71 AD
  • The sicarii remain in control of Masada, 71 AD
  • The false religion Mithraism begins to spread throughout the Roman Empire, 71 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73) The Romans lay siege to Masada, a desert fortress held by Jewish victims of the Sicarii, 72 AD
  • Great Jewish Revolt (66 - 73) The Romans capture the desert fortress of Masada. Surviving defenders commit mass suicide when defeat becomes imminent, 73 AD
  • Titus Flavius Vespasianus succeeds Vespasian his father as Roman Emperor. Titus was the Roman general responsible for the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD, June 24, 79 AD
  • Pope Anacletus succeeds Pope Linus, 79 AD
  • Gospel of Matthew (late date), 80 AD
  • Gospel of Luke (late date), 80 AD
  • Pope Anacletus elected (according to the Vatican's 2003 Annuario Pontificio, 80 AD
  • Dominitian succeeds Titus Flavius Vespasianus as Emperor of Rome, September 14, 81 AD
  • Avilius of Alexandria succeeds Anianus as Patriarchs of Alexandria, 83 AD
  • Clement of Rome elected Pope Clement I, 88 AD
  • Plutarch succeeds Polycapus as Bishop of Byzantium (the title was later known as the Patriarch of Constantinople, 89 AD
  • Publication in Syria or Phoenicia of the Gospel of Matthew by a converted Jewish scholar, 89 AD
  • Greek-speaking Christians began using hiereus (priest) to refer, first, to bishops and then, by extension, to the presbyters under them, but still making a distinction between the Jewish priesthood, pagan priesthoods, and the priesthood of Christ, 90 AD
  • Council of Jamnia (early date), 90 AD
  • Council of Jamnia standardizes the Jewish cannon (ie, the Old Testament), 92 AD
  • Clement of Rome becomes Pope Clement I (according to the Vatican's 2003 Annuario Pontificio), 92 AD
  • Josephus completes his Antiquities of the Jews, 93 AD
  • John has a vision on the isle of Patmos, writes the Book of Revelation (traditional date) 95 AD
  • Roman Emperor Nerva succeeds Domitian, September 18, 96 AD
  • Writing of the Book of Revelation, 96 AD
  • Kedron of Alexandria succeeds Avilius of Alexandria as Bishop of Alexandria, 96 AD
  • Nerva recognizes the Sanhedrin of Jamnia as an official governmental body of the Jews, and the patriarch or nasi is designated as the representative of the Jewish people in Rome, 97 AD
  • Trajan succeeds Nerva as Roman Emperor, January 27, 98 AD
  • Election of Pope Evaristus, 98 AD
  • Iudaea Province returns to direct Roman control with the death of King Herod Agrippa II, 100 AD

Births of the 1st century[]

Deaths of the 1st century[]

  • Jesus Christ, c. 33 AD
  • Saul of Tarsus (later Paul), 67 AD
  • Salome, sister of King Herod, 9 AD
  • Caesar Augustus, August 19, 14 AD
  • Publius Sulpicius Quirinius, Roman legate of Syria, 21 AD
  • Shammai, president of the Sanhedrin. Shammai's followers, the Beit Shammai, were among the more conservative Pharisees, and may have been the faction of Pharisees that opposed Jesus, 30 AD
  • Death, Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus of Nazareth, 33 AD
  • Judas Iscariot (by suicide), 33 AD
  • Stephen, the first martyr of Christianity (stoned to death by Jewish leaders for preaching Jesus was the Christ), 34 AD
  • Herod Phillip II, known as Phillip the Tetrach, ruler of Ituraea and Trachonitis. (cf Luke 3:1), 34 AD
  • Roman Emperor Tiberius - March 16, 37 AD
  • Saint Andrew, apostle, 38 AD
  • Philo of Alexandria, 40 AD
  • Roman Emperor Caligula, by assassination, 41 AD
  • James the Great, by beheading, 44 AD
  • Herod Agrippa, King of the Jews (divine intervention as punishment for blasphemy), 44 AD
  • Roman Emperor Claudius - October 13, 54 AD
  • James the Just, brother of Jesus (martyred), 62 AD
  • Mark the Evangelist (traditional date), 63 AD
  • Paul (early date; late date is 67.), 64 or 65 AD
  • Peter (early date), 64 AD
  • Paul of Tarsus: martyred, beheaded by Nero, 67 AD
  • June 29 - Simon Peter: martyred, crucified upside-down, on orders of Nero, 67 AD
  • Cestius Gallus, legate of Syria, death in battle, 67 AD
  • Roman Emperor Nero, by suicide after the Roman Senate declares him to be persona non grata, June 9, 68 AD
  • Evodius, 2nd Bishop of Antioch, 68 AD
  • Roman Emperor Galba - January 15, 69 AD
  • Roman Emperor Otho - April 16, 69 AD
  • Roman Emperor Vitellius - December 22, 69 AD
  • Roman Emperor Vespasian, June 23, 79 AD
  • Pope Linus, September 23, 79 AD
  • Titus Flavius Vespasianus, September 13, 81 AD
  • Anianus, Patriarch of Alexandria, 82 AD
  • Pope Anacletus, 88 AD
  • Pope Anacletus (according to the Annuario Pontificio), 92 AD
  • Avilius of Alexandria, Bishop of Alexandria, 95 AD
  • Roman Emperor Domitian, by assassination, September 18, 96 AD
  • Nerva, emperor of Rome, January 27, 98 AD
  • Pope Clement I, 98 or 99 AD
  • John the Apostle, 100 AD
  • Josephus, 100 AD
  • Herod Agrippa II, 100 AD
Biblical Timeline (By Centuries)
Before Christ (B.C.)
The Beginning
40th BC | 39th BC | 38th BC | 37th BC | 36th BC | 35th BC | 34th BC | 33rd BC
32nd BC | 31st BC | 30th BC | 29th BC | 28th BC| 27th BC | 26th BC | 25th BC
24th BC| 23rd BC | 22nd BC| 21st BC | 20th BC | 19th BC | 18th BC | 17th BC
16th BC | 15th BC | 14th BC| 13th BC| 12th BC| 11th BC | 10th BC | 9th BC
8th BC| 7th BC| 6th BC| 5th BC| 4th BC| 3rd BC| 2nd BC| 1st BC
Anno Domini (A.D.)
1st | 2nd | 3rd | 4th | 5th | 6th | 7th | 8th | 9th | 10th | 11th | 12th | 13th | 14th | 15th
16th | 17th | 18th | 19th | 20th | 21st | End times
1st century (1-100)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 |
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